• Not Pansexuality: "I don't care about gender!! Gender is meaningless!"
  • Pansexuality: "I understand that gender can be an important part of someone's identity, but it will have no effect on whether I am attracted to them."

theamazingindi:

extendedburning:

godtxt:

please do not let ferguson die out like everything else big does. do not let this die out. do not let this continue on for three days and then everyone forget about it. do not let this happen.

queue this post up 3 days from now, a week from now, a month from now, a month from then. make sure even if you forget your blog will remember.

the fact i’m seeing reblogs slow down despite the fact there is still news breaking is concerning

(Source: angel-scum)

betweenbodies:

real-faker:

littlecatlady:

SO WAS ANYONE ELSE WATCHING THE VMAS AND SAW THIS CAR AD

AND THEY HAD TO MAKE THE GIRL HAMSTERS SEXY

THE FUCKIN HAMSTERS NEEDED FUCKIN TITS AND CURVES

GODDAMN YOU CAN’T GET A BREAK AS A GIRL EVEN IF YOU’RE A FUCKING H A M S T E R you STILL GOTTA BE SKINNY AND HAVE BIG TITTIES

they gave the hamsters TITS they could have looked exactly like the dude ones and just had the hair and the eyelashes BUT THEY HAD TO MAKE THE HAMSTERS SEXY???

I FUCKIGN QUIT

#body horror

the furry agenda is growing

duckyshepherd:

shiraglassman:

Aviva and the Baklava
Aviva, the working-class, bisexual chef turned royal mistress, as drawn by Jane Dominguez. Here we see her in a scene from Climbing the Date Palm in which she works all night by herself to accomplish a seemingly impossible task just to ensure that her sweetheart, who is a lesbian, will be able to produce an heir to the throne without ever having to sleep with a dude.
Climbing the Date Palm is the sequel to The Second Mango. Guaranteed to contain canon femslash and supportive relationships between female characters!

EEE! this is the picture I have framed and hanging in my kitchen! I have the black and white version, I don’t think I’ve seen it colored before.
duckyshepherd:

shiraglassman:

Aviva and the Baklava
Aviva, the working-class, bisexual chef turned royal mistress, as drawn by Jane Dominguez. Here we see her in a scene from Climbing the Date Palm in which she works all night by herself to accomplish a seemingly impossible task just to ensure that her sweetheart, who is a lesbian, will be able to produce an heir to the throne without ever having to sleep with a dude.
Climbing the Date Palm is the sequel to The Second Mango. Guaranteed to contain canon femslash and supportive relationships between female characters!

EEE! this is the picture I have framed and hanging in my kitchen! I have the black and white version, I don’t think I’ve seen it colored before.

duckyshepherd:

shiraglassman:

Aviva and the Baklava

Aviva, the working-class, bisexual chef turned royal mistress, as drawn by Jane Dominguez. Here we see her in a scene from Climbing the Date Palm in which she works all night by herself to accomplish a seemingly impossible task just to ensure that her sweetheart, who is a lesbian, will be able to produce an heir to the throne without ever having to sleep with a dude.

Climbing the Date Palm is the sequel to The Second Mango. Guaranteed to contain canon femslash and supportive relationships between female characters!

EEE! this is the picture I have framed and hanging in my kitchen! I have the black and white version, I don’t think I’ve seen it colored before.

"Don’t ever compliment me by insulting other women. That’s not a compliment, it’s a competition none of us agreed to."
— "You’re not like other girls." Shut the fuck up. (via cutely-perverted)

(Source: escapedgoat)

mad-maddie:

cloudy-with-a-chance-of-doitsu:

-sharkbites:

officialcrow:

brah chill

I ALMOST HAD A HEART ATTACK

Mitosis

Canada evolves

mad-maddie:

cloudy-with-a-chance-of-doitsu:

-sharkbites:

officialcrow:

brah chill

I ALMOST HAD A HEART ATTACK

Mitosis

Canada evolves

(Source: pleatedjeans)

jamietheignorantamerican:

People are losing their fire and forgetting about Ferguson. That’s exactly what the police want, though: for all of this to just go away and for people to forget about it.

Don’t let that happen.

fatsexybitch:

whatisthat-velvet:

questionall:

Ferguson Man Forms an Inspiring Team with Cop Watchers to Hold Police Accountable [Video: http://bit.ly/1l8QoAA]

Black excellence.

More indepth info about this project:
http://thefreethoughtproject.com/ferguson-man-forms-inspiring-team-cop-watchers-hold-police-accountable/

I know gofundme has fucked shit up, but it seems like this project is about 700 away from its second goal of clip on cameras for residents

http://www.gofundme.com/Copwatching-in-Ferguson

toastyhat:

howtonotsuckatgamedesign:

evora-eriu-mclaggen:

x There. I was too weak to color it. Guess I just wanted to share it too much…

DAAAAAAMMMMMMMNNN!

this is mindblowing oh my goodness

winchesterson:

perplexingly:

geosaurus:

perplexingly:

Imagine dragons sleeping the same way giraffes do

image

Yessss! I wanna draw sleeping dragons tooo

Maybe they sleep like camels…image

or cats…

image

or…. uh… snakes?

image

Yeeeeaaaaah

Or maybe they sleep on trees

image

There is nothing about this post I don’t love

micdotcom:

India replaces the Ice Bucket Challenge with the much more sustainable Rice Bucket Challenge 

After seeing the dramatic results from the Ice Bucket Challenge, Indian journalist Manju Latha Kalanidhi was compelled to start something similar, but with an Indian slant. “I felt like doing something more locally tangible. Rice is a staple here,” Kalanidhi told CNN. “We eat it every day, we can store it for months. Why not donate rice to someone who is hungry?”
It’s fairly simple | Follow micdotcom

micdotcom:

India replaces the Ice Bucket Challenge with the much more sustainable Rice Bucket Challenge 

After seeing the dramatic results from the Ice Bucket Challenge, Indian journalist Manju Latha Kalanidhi was compelled to start something similar, but with an Indian slant. “I felt like doing something more locally tangible. Rice is a staple here,” Kalanidhi told CNN. “We eat it every day, we can store it for months. Why not donate rice to someone who is hungry?”
It’s fairly simple | Follow micdotcom

micdotcom:

India replaces the Ice Bucket Challenge with the much more sustainable Rice Bucket Challenge 

After seeing the dramatic results from the Ice Bucket Challenge, Indian journalist Manju Latha Kalanidhi was compelled to start something similar, but with an Indian slant. “I felt like doing something more locally tangible. Rice is a staple here,” Kalanidhi told CNN. “We eat it every day, we can store it for months. Why not donate rice to someone who is hungry?”
It’s fairly simple | Follow micdotcom

micdotcom:

India replaces the Ice Bucket Challenge with the much more sustainable Rice Bucket Challenge 

After seeing the dramatic results from the Ice Bucket Challenge, Indian journalist Manju Latha Kalanidhi was compelled to start something similar, but with an Indian slant. “I felt like doing something more locally tangible. Rice is a staple here,” Kalanidhi told CNN. “We eat it every day, we can store it for months. Why not donate rice to someone who is hungry?”
It’s fairly simple | Follow micdotcom

micdotcom:

India replaces the Ice Bucket Challenge with the much more sustainable Rice Bucket Challenge 

After seeing the dramatic results from the Ice Bucket Challenge, Indian journalist Manju Latha Kalanidhi was compelled to start something similar, but with an Indian slant. “I felt like doing something more locally tangible. Rice is a staple here,” Kalanidhi told CNN. “We eat it every day, we can store it for months. Why not donate rice to someone who is hungry?”
It’s fairly simple | Follow micdotcom

micdotcom:

India replaces the Ice Bucket Challenge with the much more sustainable Rice Bucket Challenge 

After seeing the dramatic results from the Ice Bucket Challenge, Indian journalist Manju Latha Kalanidhi was compelled to start something similar, but with an Indian slant. “I felt like doing something more locally tangible. Rice is a staple here,” Kalanidhi told CNN. “We eat it every day, we can store it for months. Why not donate rice to someone who is hungry?”

It’s fairly simpleFollow micdotcom

breenewsome:

Handcuff suicides are oddly common… #handsup #dontshoot #policebrutality #ourlivesmatter #ferguson #mikebrown #blacklivesmatter

stfu-moffat:

bonusvampirus:

stfu-moffat:

 said to :

I found it really weird how Jenny KEPT stressing that they’re married in Deep Breath? But I’m not sure what exactly it means. It just felt weird and unnatural for some reason.

I know. I’ve always assumed that when you’re married to someone you don’t have to keep reminding them that you’re married.

I suppose it was all the flirting with Clara, which made me uncomfortable - when women are alone together, even if they’re attracted to other women, they don’t spend all their time flirting with each other.

I think he was trying to pass the Bechdel test but couldn’t imagine female characters not flirting with each other.

But Jenny and Vastra had a very obviously mistress-servant relationship so maybe Moffat felt he had to remind the audience that they were married and lesbians*, rather than just writing them in a way that made it obvious that they were married?

- C

*Given Moffat’s attitude to bisexuals, I doubt he intends Vastra or Jenny to be anything other than purely gay.

But Jenny and Vastra had a very obviously mistress-servant relationship so maybe Moffat felt he had to remind the audience that they were married and lesbians*, rather than just writing them in a way that made it obvious that they were married?

I think this is pretty much it. Vastra and Jenny’s relationship just came off as unnatural and strained. Moffat wants Vastra and Jenny to be married so that he can get queer representation points, but Vastra is the Sherlock of Doctor Who, and that means that she needs to feel superior to everyone around her, and she can’t possibly treat this ordinary, uneducated human woman as her equal. But Jenny needs to be sassy! She needs to object to her treatment, and maybe Moffat will get feminist points for that, even if nothing ever actually changes! 

So basically what we’ve got right now is a situation where Jenny is clearly feeling used, under-appreciated, and manipulated, and she’s clearly expressing that, and her wife just isn’t listening to her. (Meanwhile, they both know damn well that Jenny has no real power in this situation and can’t really leave.) 

That’s… not what I want from my queer representation. 

And it plays into Moffat’s whole problem with telling us things rather than showing us them. He thinks that if he just repeatedly says that Vastra and Jenny are happily married and that they love each other, we’ll accept that this is a healthy relationship even if we never see them having any healthy affectionate interactions. In fact, he thinks we’ll accept this even if all of the interactions we see are unhealthy. It’s the same problem he had with Eleven/River. 

The real problem at the heart of this, though, is that he gets off on power-fantasies and he just doesn’t want his darlings (the Doctor, Vastra, Sherlock, etc) in relationships with people they see as equal. He has a massive emotional investment in holding all of them up on pedestals above mere mortals, and he thinks that being up on that pedestal gives them the right to mistreat others. If they view their (romantic, professional, whatever) partners as equal equals rather than favoured servants, the whole thing starts to unravel because, well, if Jenny is Vastra’s equal, then why not Strax? If River is Eleven’s equal, why not Amy? If John is Sherlock’s equal, why not Molly? And then suddenly they don’t have the right to be massively rude to anyone for no reason at all, and what’s the fun in that? 

It’s why I really hate that Vastra is supposed to be DW’s Sherlock. 

(I think Jenny is canonically a lesbian, because of some EU background stuff on her. I could be wrong, though. Vastra I’m not so sure about.) 

I think Vastra is less of Moffat’s darling than Sherlock and the Doctor, but she definitely shares some traits that Moffat uses with his “supertior” characters (especially the Doctor). I don’t think she’s really a power fantasy, because she doesn’t actually save anyone herself, she just summons or understands the Doctor so he can. I’m also not sure how much of her behaviour this episode was because the Doctor didn’t have his usual role (let’s hope she’s never like this again!).

But I agree with all the rest of this, especially comparing them to Eleven/River. This seems to be what he thinks relationships (on TV) should be like, rather than a reflection of what his characters are like and how that would be reflected in their relationships - they all end up trapped in unhealthy or abusive roles.

- C